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Post Rehab: Focus of Kinesiotherapy within Rehabilitation

What is a Kinesiotherapist and how can they help you?

A kinesiotherapist is a health care professional who, under the direction of a physician or physical therapist, treats the effects of disease, injury and congenital disorders, through the use of therapeutic exercise and education. This includes land-based and aquatic post-therapy.

The kinesiotherapist is academically and clinically prepared to provide A kinesiotherapist is educated in areas of basic exercise science and clinical applications of rehabilitation exercise. Training is received in orthopedic, neurological, psychiatric, pediatric, cardiovascular-pulmonary, and geriatric practice settings.rehabilitation exercise and education under the prescription of a licensed physician in an appropriate setting. Kinesiotherapists are accountable to the referring physician for the actions of themselves and those of their subordinates. The academic and clinical basis of Kinesiotherapy is founded on the two fundamental modalities of exercise and education.

Kinesiotherapists are qualified to implement exercise programs designed to reverse or minimize debilitation and enhance the functional capacity of medically stable patients in a wellness, sub-acute, or extended care setting. The role of the kinesiotherapist demands intelligence, judgment, honesty, interpersonal skills and the capacity to react to emergencies in a calm and reasoned manner. An attitude of respect for self and others, adherence to the concepts of privilege and confidentiality in communicating with patients and a commitment to the patient's welfare are standard attributes.

A kinesiotherapist is educated in areas of basic exercise science and clinical applications of rehabilitation exercise. Training is received in orthopedic, neurological, psychiatric, pediatric, cardiovascular-pulmonary, and geriatric practice settings.

Aquatic Post-Therapy

In a pool, it is possible to perform vigorous aerobic exercise without the weight-bearing and joint compression experienced on land due to the hydrodynamics and the physical properties of the water.

Additionally, aquatic exercise would seem to be an excellent intervention for many medically complex patients due to the inherent properties of water itself. These properties include buoyancy, turbulence, viscosity, hydrostatic pressure, temperature, and surface tension.

Aquatic therapy for many patients can cover the spectrum of therapeutic intervention.Patients who present with specific, treatable, musculoskeletal dysfunctions such as an inability to stabilize the spine, postural imbalance, poor spinal mobility, and weak trunk musculature may be treated 1:1 in the pool by a trained therapist.

This treatment may incorporate task simulation, joint and soft tissue mobility via a specialty technique such as Watsu®, or spinal stabilization via the Bad Ragaz Ring or Halliwick Methods to name a few.

Group classes should be focused on moderate aerobic activity, functionality and fun!